RNI ALL FILMS 4.0 PRO Review

Two questions I’m asked often on social media are 1) how do I edit my photos and 2) what software do I use?

1) I edit my photos based on a personal preference as well as on subject matter. It all really depends on the mood I’m going for. Sometimes I like deep contrast or faded blacks, while other times I like light and airy. But one thing I do like to do with all my edits is create a film-like look to them.

The most important aspect of all my edits starts with a properly exposed image. You can’t just throw on a preset and call it a day, especially when the image is under or over exposed. Well, technically you can throw a preset on any image, but that’s not how to successfully use presets, more on this later…

2) What software do I use? Because I’m usually editing 100s of images per project (sometimes 1000s), 90% of the time I’m culling and color/exposure correcting images in Lightroom. From there, I’ll apply various presets that I’ve created and/or purchased depending on the look I’m going for. I’ve found for me, that’s the best way to go about getting a cohesive look.

For the last few years, I’ve been using a lot of VSCO presets. When I’m not editing so many images, I do like to use photoshop and develop my raw image there, then use a preset plug in called Alien Skin. While I love the look of some of their presets, I’ve found this workflow to be a little slow so I only use this approach for a small number of photos. Alien Skin has released an update and their new Exposure allows you to batch edit/process.

So back to presets and their success and failures… There are so many out there. Google lightroom presets and you’ll see a plethora of links to free and not so free goodies. Some good, some great and some just bad. In my opinion, presets are meant for two things: To enhance your photo and/or to simulate a look, which in my case, I like to simulate a film-like look.

Presets are pretty much the equivalent of filters that you see and hear about often on social media. You’ve all see the hashtag #nofilter, implying that a filter wasn’t needed to make this photo look good. While I can agree filters aren’t always needed, it doesn’t mean applying filters are a bad thing – when used properly.

When I mentioned earlier that you can’t just throw a preset on a photo and call it a day, I say that because I see so many “pro” photographers doing this resulting in a pretty crappy edit. This is why presets and filters can sometimes get a bad rap, because they’re not used properly. Moderation and subtly really go a long way and it’s always a good idea to tweak your edits.

When using mobile apps like VSCO or Instagram, it use to be applying a filter mean you were all in, 100% with the look. Thankfully with recent updates to their app, you’ll finally see a slider that allows you to go from 0-100%. They’re basically telling you to tweak your edit.

So my advice? Start with a decently exposed image, then apply your preset or filter but do so in moderation depending on the look you want. Sometimes you’ll want to go balls to the wall and sometimes maybe a little goes a long way.

So this brings me to RNI, aka Real Nice Images.

When I stumbled on RNI Films, I was drawn to their process of how they try and simulate film.

Born from real film
All RNI film presets derive from real film stocks. For present films we shoot the same subjects on both film and digital and then use our proprietary technology to produce a beautiful and accurate match in Lightroom. For the films no longer available we acquire negatives, slides and prints from private collections and use them as references while shooting similar subject on digital to match.
Download RNI Films 4.0 Pro

The fact that they literally shoot with both film and digital and match the digital file to the film photo is amazing and shows they’re serious about emulating film. Like VSCO, they also provide camera profiles to really get the most of your RAW files from your specific camera, but they also work will with JPEGS.

Kodak Portra 160VC – 01

Kodak Gold 400 – 01

For Mac computers, RNI provides a .pkg installation package file that installs the lightroom and photoshop presets automatically. They also provide a .pdf if you’d rather install them manually. Windows users will need to install them manually regardless (which is a pretty simple process).

Off bat, compared to VSCO presets, I find that RNI Films presets need about the same (maybe a little less) fine tuning which is nice as anything that helps speed up workflow is always welcome.

So far, I’m really loving the results of the RNI Films 4.0 Pro. I am by no means a film expert, nor do I shoot with these particular films… but I’m loving the looks I’m getting with their presets. They also offer a lite version of these presets but I would recommend investing in the Pro set.

Below are more examples, some of which I normally wouldn’t use for my editing style, but I did want to show some variety in presets (I tend to stick to Kodak Portra). There are drastic edit examples as well as some that are more subtle. If you have any questions about these presets, please hit up the comments and I’ll be sure to get back to you!

Download RNI Films 4.0 Pro

Kodak Portra 400 – 01

*Applied to JPEG, Fuji Pro 160NS – 03 – EV-

*Applied to JPEG, Agfa Scala 200 – 04 – Faded +

Fuji Natura 1600 – 03 – Cool

Fuji Pro 160NS – 08 – Green Fade

Agfa Optima 100 – 08 – Vivid

Polaroid 600 – 08 – Warm

Agfacolor 40s

Kodak Portra 400 – v.2 – Green Fade

Fuji Fortia SP – Alt

Fuji Pro 800Z – 03 – EV+

Kodachrome 50s – Warm Fade

Kodachrome 1958 – Faded

Polaroid 600 – 05 – Expired

Fuji Pro 800Z – 02 – EV-

Agfa Scala 200 – 04 – Faded+

Agfa Optima 100 – 08 – Vivid

Presets included in their 4.0 Pro pack are:

NEGATIVE FILMS
Agfa Optima
Agfa Optima 400
Agfa Vista 100
Fuji Natura 1600
Fuji Pro 160C
Fuji Pro 160NS
Fuji Pro 400H
Fuji Pro 800Z
Fuji Superia 200
Fuji Superia 400
Fuji Superia 800
Fuji Superia 1600
Kodak Color Plus
Kodak Color Plus
Kodak Ektar 100
Kodak Gold 100
Kodak Gold 200
Kodak Gold 400
Kodak Portra 160C
Kodak Portra 160VC
Kodak Portra 400
Kodak Portra 800
Rollei Digibase

SLIDE FILMS
Agfa Precisa 100
Agfa RSX II 100
Fuji Astia 100F
Fuji Fortia SP
Fuji Provia 100F
Fuji Provia 400X
Fuji Sensia 100
Fuji Velvia 100
Fuji Velvia 100F
Fuji Velvia 50
Kodak E100G
Kodak E100GX
Kodak E100VS
Kodak E200
Kodak Elite
Kodak Elite Chrome 100

INSTANT FILMS
Fuji FP 100C
Fuji Instax Mini
Polaroid 600
Polaroid 669
Polaroid 690

B&W FILMS
Agfa Scala 200
Fomapan 100
Ilford Delta 100
Ilford Delta 3200
Ilford Delta 400
Ilford Delta 800
Ilford FP4
Ilford HP5
Ilford Pan F Plus
Kodak T-Max 100
Kodak T-Max 3200
Kodak Tri-x 100
Kodak Tri-x 400

VINTAGE FILMS
Agfacolor 40s
Agfacolor 50s
Agfacolor 60s
Agfacolor XPS 160
Kodachrome 1958
Kodachrome 1959
Kodachrome 2000’s
Kodachrome 40s
Kodachrome 50s
Kodachrome 60s
Kodachrome 64
Technicolor 2

RNI TOOLKIT – LIGHTROOM ONLY
Jpeg tone compensation
Fade
Hard Fade
Grain
Slide Frames
Smart Contrast
Vignette
Analog Softness
Vintage Lens Effect

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